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Deer Valley Plumbing Contractors, Inc
 
Deer Valley Plumbing Contractors, Inc

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Tip of the Week     

Keep a pitcher of water in the refrigerator instead of running the tap for cold drinks, so that every drop goes down you and not the drain. Many people think bottled water is healthier than good ol' water from the tap and cleaner too. But research has found that is not true. In fact, bottled water could contain more impurities than tap water. Here are just some reasons to skip the bottled water and opt for tap. 1) Tap water is highly regulated and must check for traces of E.coli and fecal coliform bacteria 100 times per month, bottled water is only required to test once a week. 2) Tap water must be tested by the government in certified labs, bottled water doesn't have such requirements. 3) The bottles themselves are unhealthy, a chemical is added to the plastic to make it less brittle and when the bottles gets warm, those chemicals leach into the water. So break out the pitcher and pour in some good ol’ tap water!!!!

  



Tip of the Week:

                 Make sure your swimming pools, fountains and ponds are equipped with recirculating pumps. These pumps circulate water through pipes to submerged filters and skimmers, where it’s cleaned and reused, over and over. A recirculation pump also comes in handy when it’s time to clean the pool or pond, just attach a hose to the pump’s cleanout outlet and it will pump out the water for you. In addition, this crucial piece of equipment helps you save money by reusing the same water over and over again.


Tip of the Week

Group plants with the same watering needs together to get the most out of your watering time. Companion planng is the planting of different plants in proximity on the theory that they assist each other in nutrient uptake, pest control and pollination. For gardeners the combinations of plants also make for a more varied, attractive vegetable garden and they find they can discourage harmful pests without losing the beneficial allies.

 

Turn The Water Off While You Shampoo Your Hair

Tip of the Week:


Turn the water off while you shampoo and condition your hair and you can save
more than 50 gallons of water a week. The method used to reduce water use in showers is to turn off the water while lathering and shampooing, often called a “navy shower”. The method requires three steps: 1) turn on water to rinse body and hair; 2) turn off water while shampooing hair and washing body with soap and washcloth; 3) resume water flow and rinse off all shampoo and soap. Using this technique can
reduce the water flow by at least 5 minutes and at 2 gallons a minute coming out of your showerhead, that is a huge savings in water and in your utility bills.

 

 

 Tip of the Week:

 

Periodically check your pool for leaks if you have an automatic refilling device.  To check for a leak in your pool, turn off the auto-fill device. Next take a white plastic bucket and place it on the top step of the pool and fill it with pool water so that the level of water in the bucket is exactly the same as the level of water in the pool. A white bucket is necessary as a dark colored bucket will absorb heat and cause the water to evaporate quicker. Turn off all the pumps and water features, nothing should be moving in the water. Over the next several days monitor the evaporation of both the pool and bucket of water. If the pool water is lower than the bucket water, you have a leak. If the pool water and the bucket of wter are the same, then everything is fine.

 

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Tip of the Week:

 

Use porous materials for walkways and patios to keep water in your yard and prevent wasteful runoff. Although concrete lasts a long time creating durable patios, driveways and roads, the production of concrete takes a lot of energy. Whenever the ground is covered with concrete, rain doesn’t seep into the soil. Groundwater is a source of drinking water for many people. It also nourishes deep-rooted plants and trees. Replenished by rain and melting snow, groundwater has become an endangered resource. When you want to build a patio or walkway there are many attractive options that will permit water to drain into the ground.

 

 

 

 

 

Tip of the Week:

Minimize evaporation by watering during the early morning hours when temperatures are cooler and winds are lighter.  When you use sprinklers, some water evaporates before it hits the ground. On a hot, windy day, the amount of water that never reaches your grass can actually be quite substantial. To reduce loss to evaporation, water sometime between 4 A.M. and 9 A.M., when the air is still cool and the wind is usually at its calmest.

 

Tip of the Week:

Set the thermostat to 120F or less for normal use, saving money, energy and even skin eliminating scalds.  A water heater thermostat won't actually lower your bill. All water heaters have a thermostat as standard equipment. The thermostat mechanism is what instructs the electric or gas to shut off when the water has reached the correct temperature. Lowering the temperature setting on your water heater can save money and energy. It takes less energy to maintain the water at a slightly lower temperature.

 

Evaporative coolers require a season maintenance checkup, for more efficient cooling, check your evaporative cooler annually.  An evaporative heat rejection device enables homeowners to take advantage of the operating cost savings inherent in water-cooled systems. A well-maintained tower enables the entire cooling system to perform at optimum efficiency by conserving both energy and water.

 

 

 

Tip of the Week:  

 

Start a compost pile using compost when you plant adds water-holding organic matter to soil.  Compost is one of nature’s best mulches and soil amendments, and you can use it instead of commercial fertilizers. Best of all, compost is cheap. You can make it without spending a cent. Using compost improves soil structure, texture, and aeration and increases the soil’s water-holding capacity. About one third of the space in landfills is taken up with organic waste from our yards and kitchens, just the type of material that can be used in compost. With a small investment in time, you can contribute to the solution to a community problem, while at the same time enriching the soil and improving the health of the plants on your property.

 

 

Tip of the Week:  

Turn off the water while you shave and you can save more than 100 gallons a week

A standard faucet can use about 2-3 gallons of water per minute. Turning off the faucet while shaving will save 2-3 gallons per minute you shave, which can be a lot of water depending on how long and often you shave. In addition to saving money, using less water allows more water to stay in the ground or in a reservoir which helps to maintain a natural water balance and preserve water for future use.

 

 

 

 

Tip of the Week: 

If you don't have a low flow toilet, use plastic bottles filled with water and pebbles to replace water in the tank. Don't obstruct the float and don't use a brick.  Standard toilets can use as much as seven gallons of water per flush. Low-flows? A mere 16 gallons. If you want the water savings of a low-flow toilet, but aren't ready to shell out for a new toilet, you're in luck. With a few simple modifications, you can turn your water-guzzling toilet into a water-sipping low-flow just by using some simple household items. You can even purchase a tank bag, fill it with water and hand it in your toilet tank, this will also reduce the amount of water needed to refill the tank after each flush.

 

 

Tip of the Week

 

Use a broom instead of a hose to clean your driveway or sidewalk and save water every time.

An outdoor hose can use about 20-30 gallons of water per minute. Often a broom can clean a driveway or sidewalk just as well as a hose. If it takes 10-20 minutes to clean your driveway, you can save several hundred gallons of water each time. In addition, you reduce storm water run off which, combined with chemicals on your driveway, impacts water quality. Using less water allows more to stay in the ground or in a surface reservoir, which helps to maintain a natural water balance.

 

 

 

Tip of the Week

 

If the side of your water heater feels warm near the top, install an insulation blanket.  Insulating water heaters should be done to reduce heat loss and save money on standby energy losses. Generally, insulating kits for water heaters cost around $20 and pay for themselves in reduced energy costs in less than a year. Always make sure to use the appropriate type of blanket for your water heater, whether it's electric or gas. Follow the manufacturer's installation instructions carefully. If you are uncomfortable insulating a water heater it is best left to a qualifed contractor.

 

 

 

Tip of the Week

 

Attach low flow aerators to kitchen and bathroom faucets. The faucet will flow stronger while using much less water.  Its inexpensive and simple to install, low-flow faucet aerators can reduce your home water consumption as much as 50%, and reduce your energy cost of heating the water also by as much as 50%. This conservation of water and energy is not only good for the environment, but the savings in your utility bills will pay for the cost of the aerators within a few months. From then on, you enjoy continued savings.

 

 

Tip of the Week

 

 

 

Winterize outdoor spigots (hose bibs) when temperatures dip to prevent pipes from bursting or freezin. 

A frozen pipe can lead to a burst pipe, and a burst pipe means costly repairs and potential structural damage. Prevention is the key to avoiding burst pipes during the winter. Winterize your home's hose bibs as an annual maintenance task before it gets cold and you could save yourself a lot of headache.

 

 

 

 Tip of the Week

 

Contact a qualifed contractor to fix that leaky faucet. Tired of seeing your money go down the drain? A leaky faucet can cost you a significant amount of money if it is not taken care of right away because it will not be long until those drops have accumulated gallons of water that have gone to waste, not to mention the annoying sound of the drip, drip, drip. It's simple, inexpensive and can save 140 gallons of water a week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tip of the Week

 

Put food coloring in your toilet tank to check for leaks.  If you have a slow leak in your toilet tank, hundreds of gallons are just slowly and silently cascading down the side of your toilet bowl every month. Fortunately you can easily detect if the uptick in your water bill is from a slow leak or not. Simply put the food coloring into the toilet tank and wait for about a half hour, if seeps into the toilet bowl, you have a leak. Fortunately its an easy fix and can save hundreds of gallons of water a month.

 

 

 

 

 

Tip of the Week

 

Adjust your watering schedule to the season. Water your summer lawn every third day and your winter lawn every fifth day

Make sure you water thoroughly and deeply at each watering, but allow the soil to dry out between irrigations. By watering this way, roots are encouraged to grow deep into the soil where they’ll be better protected from the summer heat and dryness. 


Contact a qualified contractor to fix that leaky faucet.

Tired of seeing your money go down the drain? A leaky faucet can cost you a significant amount of money if it is not taken care of right away because it will not be long until those drops have accumulated gallons of water that have gone to waste, not to mention the annoying sound of the drip, drip, drip. It's simple, inexpensive and can save 140 gallons of water a week.

Winterize outdoor spigots (hose bibs) when temperatures dip to prevent pipes from bursting or freezing.  A frozen pipe can lead to a burst pipe, and a burst pipe means costly repairs and potential structural damage. Prevention is the key to avoiding burst pipes during the winter. Winterize your home's hose bibs as an annual maintenance task before it gets cold and you could save yourself a lot of headache.

When you shop for a new appliance, consider one offering cycling and load size adjustments. They are more water and energy efficient than older appliances.  It pays to think about the appliances you’re buying and the ways they are being used. Choosing correctly can help you save money in the long term and reduce your impact on the environment.  When buying a new appliance, there are two key energy labels to look out for:

  • the Energy Saving Trust Recommended logo can only be used on the most energy efficient products, usually the top 20 per cent of those available
  • the EU energy label grades products from A (best) to G (worst) for energy use, with the scale going up to A++ for fridges and freezers

You could also look at how water efficient a new appliance is. Often, the more energy efficient a machine is, the less water it will use. You can check water consumption on the EU energy label which, for washing machines and dishwashers, shows litres of water used per wash:

  • when choosing a washing machine, look for a machine that uses less than 13 gallons per wash
  • for dishwashers, look for one that uses less than 4 gallons per wash
 
 
 
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